Germany Set New Solar Generation Record in July

Last month, Germany produced 5.1 terawatt hours of electricity from its photovoltaic cells.  That is a little more than the 5 terawatt hour record German wind power generation set last January.  The July solar electricity output is a new solar generation record for Germany.

This recent milestone is one of many for the country that stands head and shoulders above the rest of the world in its rapid embrace of solar energy. As a point of comparison, Clean Technica notes,

In terms of total solar power capacity per capita, Germany crushes every other country. At the end of 2012, it had approximately 400 MW of solar power capacity per million people, considerably more than #2 Italy at 267 MW per million people, #3 Belgium at 254 MW per million people, and #4 Czech Republic at 204 MW per million, and #5 Greece at 143 MW per million people. The US came it at #20 with about 25 MW per million people.

As Germany strives for a lofty goal of receiving 80 percent of its power from renewable sources by 2050, government subsidies are playing a big role in the rapid growth of renewable energy. Germany’s simple feed-in tariff policy, which pays renewable energy producers (e.g. solar energy producers) a set amount for the electricity they produce under long-term contracts, has driven the solar power boom. As installations continue to outpace government targets, Germany announced it will begin scaling back its feed-in tariff beginning this month.

Germany’s long-term policies to incentivize renewable energy have had a significant impact on reducing the “soft” costs associated with solar installation, such as permitting, inspection, interconnection, financing, customer acquisition. In fact, residential PV systems installed last year in Italy, Australia, and Germany are nearly 40 percent lower than in the U.S.

 

One thought on “Germany Set New Solar Generation Record in July

  1. Bill: This weekend, I was in Western North Carolina,Cleveland County, to be precise. This is a very depressed area of that state. I was left to wonder what regulatory hoops the developers of the solar electric farms, some as small as twenty acres, had to negotiate. I compare that with what West Virginia places in the way of such projects. It is time for a change. A real change.

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